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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
, but government and opposition forces have shown little sign of letting up in their fighting. >> united nations and arab league envoy organized the tuesday for the festival. government and opposition forces agree to lay down their arms from friday through monday. they agree to lay down arms from friday through monday, but arm commanders say they reserve the right to retaliate against rebel attacks. the head of the opposition forces military council says he's skeptical that government forces will stick to their word. >> the two sides kept up the fighting. several place as head of the truce. government forces are said to have reinforcements. neither side respected a cease-fire in april. buddhists and muslims in western myanmar have taken up their fight against. at least 56 people have been killed. nearly 2,000 homes destroyed. government has declared a state of emergency in the region. government officials say the fighting there begin to escalate on sunday. 90% of myanmar's population is buddhist. the minority have grown frustrated with being discriminated against. at least 90 people died in clas
on the internet shows serious trouble fighters saw some early executing what appears to be government soldiers. job figures are out in the u.s. today at the battle for the white house goes to ohio and wisconsin. dozens of young men have been shocked by the military in northeastern nigeria. welcome to bbc world news. also, the world bank says burma and will get its first development plan. and, tackling the energy question. human rights groups have condemned a video posted on the internet which appears to show syrian rebels of executing captured government soldiers. amnesty international says if confirmed, it constitutes a war crime. we are asking whether this is something new. >> it has happened before. but now it is becoming more and more obvious that the rebels are committing killings like the regime, and at the same level, both of them. it is just days before a big conference in doha where the opposition is asked to unified under one group, in order to bid but to lead the rebels on the ground, because there's a big discrepancy between the political leadership and the rebels on the ground who
government has revealed that billions of dollars reserve for reconstruction following the disaster last year are being misspent. $150 billion were set aside for the rebuilding of infrastructure damaged in the disaster, yet a government order just now found a quarter of the projects being funded are simply not related to tsunami damage. a short while ago i spoke to bbc tokyo correspondent and he told me about the kinds of projects that are being funded. >> the list that has come out is quite extraordinary. i will just go down a few of them. building a road in distant oconomowoc, prison vocational training with japanese subsidies and renovation of government offices in tokyo, fighter pilot training, semiconductor research, i could go on, and the list does go on. clearly lots of projects that seem to have nothing to do with reconstruction after the tsunami disaster. completely different parts of japan appeared to be getting a large amounts of money from this budget. >> any attempt to account for that? or is the government just saying that this is wrong? >> the japanese prime minister of a in pa
. >> my main message to everybody involved is that we have to take this seriously. the federal government is working with state and local governments. it will be very important that populations in all the affected states take this seriously. listen to your state and local elected officials. >> president obama has to oversee the hurricane response in the midst of an election. how he handled the crisis could impact the results. the storm is disrupting campaign stops and early voting schedules. it is clearing supermarket shelves in new york, one of the major cities in its past president. and scrambled to stock up on batteries, a tortoise, and canned fruits -- torches. the new york stock exchange will close its trading floor. the prospect of weather systems colliding makes people apprehensive with a fear that they are headed for a perfect storm. bbc news, new york. >> let's go live to staten island in new york. a resident is joining us. what is it like and how worried are you? >> i am really not worried, because we have taken all the precautions we can, short of evacuating. we have enough foo
the country and the candidates is we're going to elect a candidate who is going to govern by asking us to make choices that we haven't anticipated. and as a result, we're going to feel betrayed to some extent, even if we voted for that candidate. >> the debates were the most watched in a long time. your field intersects politics and entertainment. do you think entertainment values had something to do with this? >> well, i think suspense was what was required down to the wire. and that's what we got. one won one, another won another. then a couple of draws. what could be better for keeping people watching? unfortunately, the lack of an answer to who sacrifices what is only the beginning of an endless list that, for me, is a reason to be disappointed, not just in the debates, but in the entire campaign. i want to find out about things that are important, about plutocracy taking over democracy, the widening gulf between the powerful and the powerless. wall street, global warming, on and on. at most, they made a cameo appearance during the debate. and i think they were trivialized by the context.
about terrorism. the european union is now considering sending troops to train government forces in the west african country. a senior eu official says member states are discussing plans to send about 200 troops to the country. the official said they will not take part. forces are to trade malian soldiers early. mali has been split in half. islamic fundamentalists with links to al qaeda have taken over the northern part of the country. european leaders say if the situation continues, northern mali could become a hotbed of terrorist activity. the u.n. security council is debating the issue, it its considering, sending thousands of international troops, mainly from west african nations. japan's hitachi will buy a brit, power company to strengthen its nuclear plant business. the company said on tuesday that it will purchase all shares of nuclear power next month for $1 billion. horizon planning to build six nuclear reactors at two locations in britain. and the reactors by the early 2020s. >> hi,000aw >> britain has not changed its nuclear energy policy despite rising opposition to n
seven children, were killed when government warplanes bombed residential areas in the province of idlib. ariel attacks were also reportedly launched on eastern suburbs of the capital damascus. the top united nations investigator on palestinian human rights is calling for a boycott of all companies linked to settlements in the occupied west bank. the special rapporteur on human rights in the palestinian territories confirms the oldest firms including hewlett packard, a volvo and caterpillar are complicit in the israeli occupation. >> this is an attempt to reach out beyond the intergovernment international institutional systems and one of the things that our report recommends is encouragement of the boycott of these named corporations, and encouragement of civil society actors to join in that boycott. >> the obama administration has rejected this proposal, calling it "irresponsible and unacceptable." planned parenthood has filed a new lawsuit challenging a funding ban in texas that seeks to exclude it from a program for low-income women. the texas program offers cancer and health screenin
. on the tape, 10 prisoners were forced to lie on top of one another at an overrun military checkpoints. anti-government fighters are seen kicking and taunting the captured soldiers before opening fire. amnesty international has condemned the footage saying its picks "utter disregard for international humanitarian l new reports warning global inequality has reached a 20-year high. according to the group save the children, poverty that havee previously been concentrated in the world's lowest income countries is now on the rise in middle income countries, which account for 70% of the world's poor. those are some of the headlines. welcome to "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are broadcasting from st. louis, missouri, from missouri public television and from new york city. over 4 million people have entered their fourth day without power across 12 states, folling theevastating superstorm sandy. concern is growing for people who lack food, water, and heat. we begin today's show in the brooklyn neighborhood of red hook, one of the hardest-hit areas of the city.
institutions and government. there is a collective sense of denial too about how poorly presented the city is for events of this scale. how poorly prepared have we been, steve? >> well, very, especially about flood waters. irene, tropical storm irene was only six months ago and the water, you remember, washed right up to the top of the battery but didn't come over. it wasn't hard to image then what a surge of ten or 11 or 12 feet higher might have done. and yet, it seems, and we'll have time to sort all of this south when we get through this emergency, that very little was done to protect underground infrastructure from a very predictable surge. first of all. second of all, the extent to which the transportation and power system were vulnerable to this kind of weather, was known for ten years, predicted. again it's not clear that either in the private sector or the public sector, the city was willing to invest in what are frankly very large sums necessary to prevent this kind of disruption. >> rose: let me turn to you, paul. in your piece i think you cite the fact that insurance companies
erupted between government forces and rebel fighters earlier today near a northern military base. a number of anti regime protests have been held across syria, with troops firing tear gas and live rounds to disperse demonstrators in several areas. on thursday, a u.n. spokesperson for secretary- general ban ki-moon said the ceasefire marked a critical juncture for the syrian conflict. >> the secretary general welcomes the reported announcements about a suspension of violence during the eid holiday. obviously, the world is watching to see what will happen on friday morning. it is in everybody's interest, not least the long suffering syrian people, that the guns fall silent to our morning for the eid holiday. >> 21 people are dead across the caribbean, including 11 in cuba, after hurricane sandy slammed the region with heavy rains and powerful winds. the late-season storm hit the bahamas late thursday and is now expected to head for the united states. forecasters are warning the storm could collide with another from canada, creating a potentially devastating hybrid that could ravage parts of
acted. >> the government has lied and have made a mockery of the greek people with this list. they were obliged to pass it to parliament or to the justice system. > w i'm david eades. also coming up in the program -- how does china spread the wealth? we reflect on one of the great challenges facing the next generation of leaders. and from action man to a man of inaction, does this latest stunt explain president putin's bad back and the cancellation of appointments? >> hello. thanks very much for being with us. millions of americans are grad weight waking up to a third day without power as they continue to count the cost of the superstorm, sandy. within the last hour, new york's subway has resumed a limited service at least. elsewhere, transport and infrastructure remains is he severely affected. today, 70 people are known to have been killed during the storm. on a visit to one of the worst affected areas, new jersey, president obama promised senior officials in all the affected states, 17 of them, that they have a direct line to his staff at the white house. we have this from new york.
in the government's response to the financial crisis and among the first to identify the foreclosure problem and call for action to help troubled homeowners. her leadership of the f.d.i.c. through it tumultuous time, forbes named her the second most powerful woman in the world behind angela merkel. she has a new book called, "bull by the horns: fighting to save main street from wall street, and wall street from itself." i'm pleased to have her here at this table again. was the title easy for you? >> the title was my publisher's. i have to admit. it's a good title. my title was, it could have been different." but that title probably sells more book >> the dedication-- to me m.r.i. beloved children and my husband, scott. a true-- >> is that because he had a wife who was working all the time? >> yes, and even when she was home she was preoccupied with work. he filled in through the crisis. the kids never resented their stay-away mom because he was there for the parent teacher conferences, the school concerts. he was there for all of that. >> rose: looking back at that tenure what was the proud
leadership posts at the bank. the parliament cannot require women to be considered and governments could still approve the nominee to the post. but they hope they're sending a message. >> so what are your thoughts and could or should this ever happen here? wrote, don't we wish. >> we are seeing trends of companies addressing the matter. arehe they willing to put their words into actions? it is become apparent -- the companies and organizations and countries make more money when there's parity on board. the suisse research found that 13% more is what they make when they have parity on board. we talk about binders a issues related to, there are qualified women who can fill these posts. there's a natural gaffetation to hire women like them. we love to see these things happening stateside. there's clear remember no assistance. while there's 325 votes to not accept the nomination there were 325 to accept them and 29 people said we are not going to weigh in. there's a cultural shift that happens. in order to push that shift forward, we do need laws and thinkings like this to happen. >> if you
the cause of death. doctors have been fined and now the independentian government is considering tightening things up. >> some locals call it neocolonialism. foreign drug companies using poor and illiterate indians as guinea pigs in drug trials. >> our family has been destroyed by this and the drug company should know it. >> the doctors who carry out the trials may be in denial. but they are now being disciplined. and lawyers are asking if we can trust the results of the trials. >> the global implication potentially would be whether those findings can be safely relied upon. >> india has obvious eye trackses to the foreign drug -- attractions to the foreign drug companies. there are educated, english-speaking doctors, and a vast population from which to choose trial subjects, all of whom are required under indian law to give their informed consent. >> i put my thumbprint on the document and my daughter-in-law signed in hindi, but the form was in english, so we couldn't understand everything. >> but that was enough for a 3-day-old healthy boy to be given a trial polio vaccine. he had a severe
of listening. there is no sign of much movement from the german government. >> i do not suppose it helped angela merkel when we look at the employment figures coming out today. not comfortable. >> no, because the argument becomes very, very real if your own economy is slowing down. the figures from germany showed the rate of unemployment remaining the same but the actual number going up a little bit. the movement is in the wrong direction. maybe the economy needs a bit of stimulus. >> thanks very much. a former serbian army chief is appealing his conviction of crimes against humanity and war crimes. it was chief of staff and the yugoslav army and was found guilty of aiding and abetting the shelling of sarajevo. chief of staff, pretty near the top of the trees in many respects. what is his argument? >> right at the top, he was the chief of staff in the yugoslav army and was found guilty of aiding and abetting those on the ground carrying out these crimes. his defense has been arguing that the ammunition on the ground cannot be directly attributed to their clients and saying that the eviden
huge powers over this country and that was to a prime minister who apoint the government, half of the senate and apoints some of the judges, the head of the k.g.b. and also the head of the electoral commission. do you think that's too much power concentrated in the hands of one man? >> don't you think it's time to open up, he asks? s >> the west's real agenda, the president is, is to open up the belarusian economy, which would make it vulnerable to the problems of the rest of europe. she is a jurenlist for russian newspaper. in 2010 irina and her husband, a former presidential candidate, were jailed for organizing process. their son at the time. authoritieseatened to take him away. international pressure got irina out of jail and under house arrest. >> today she is allowed to leave the house, but not the city. police visit regularly ofte has another trial pending. >> one of ourrnn is country. she can't leave the cub. i can vouch for her personally. i know she's not a criminal. can i ask why she's not even allowed to go and see a doctor in moscow? >> the president looks surprise
be created and they could write lyrics that would be critical of government without being explicit. it is a fascinating place. i don't know if you have been to brazil. tavis: many times, i cannot get back there often enough. the fact that now this country is hosting the olympics with a woman president. >> i was just talking with the driver who drove me here. we were talking about that. there was a lot of preparation for a woman to be president. the last two presidents we have had just prepare the country for this. we are onto something really special with brazil. it is going to show a lot of joy to the world and hopefully we will win the world cup that is coming up. tavis: speaking of brazil, let me close by asking what you say about the music of brazil today and whether it is as vibrant and if you are hearing the kind of nuances and innovation that you think are necessary to keep it alive in brazil. >> absolutely. brazil is a fantastic country. it takes everything in and transforms it and then sends it out. it keeps doing that. it has this ability to really look out and be very pr
subsidize in part the culture with some government support of saying it's important. >> the amount of government support for pbs is relatively small, a huge part of the support comes from people who care about it. it's not actually a subsidized activity so much as it is subject to market forces and there are a set of people who say i want that i like it want to pay for it and i think you see this with new technology platforms like kick starter where people r you know, saying hey, would you like this, would you pay for this and there is this incredible new direct mechanism for authors an other creators to say would you care about what i wanted to do. >> i'm so glad that you brought that up. because i think the elitist element was that books were selected and it was the editor who selected it. and then it was put into certain book stores. and the independent book store which i am a great fan of was a little intimidating for people who didn't know, how to find the book that they want. then the superstores tried to make that better and the big box merchandisers but books have always be
white people who come out to the polls. look who our base is. typically people who need government most have worst turn out records by virtue of income and education. no matter what the election if they want to win. >> i want to consider -- they talk in terms -- we talked about this before the taping but they talk in terms of the ground game with democrats of this point, more offices, more personnel just having much -- >> like the -- >> republicans are spending their money on tv ads and democrats are spending on the ground game which democrats have decided this election is more important. i wonder if the republicans need as big a ground game because they have the churches. they have the pastors at the mega churches all over this country telling their parishioners, their members to go out and vote republican. >> churches are both democrat and republican. >> because they're working their butts off on ground. >> but i would say this for obama he's been campaigning for a year and a half. romney had very tumultuous primary, the president still can't move the needle. we talk about gender gap
. whether the government s getting authoritarian is troubling all of us. >> rose: but the secular state remains? >> of course, no problem about that. sigs secular state remains and democracy is working in turkey. >> rose: and erdogan goes around the world preaching secularism. he went to cairo and preached secularism. >> i'm happy about that. >> rose: go ahead. >> i'm happy that erdogan is preaching secularism in cairo. i'm also happy about arab spring you look at libya, you don't know what's going on there, syria, you don't know how that's going to end. it's the rise of islamists in the middle east. what's your perspective and where it might be going? >> okay, first, i'm a writer. i judge events, human point of view instead of ideological preconceived ideas and for me democracy is the criteria for democracy, i believe in democracy because it's morally important. it's a moral issue democracy means first of all morally that you go to people and ask their opinions in that sense i'm very happy about the arab spring about whether it's in turkey or say in cairo the army is marginalize add bi
for the incumbent zero to occupy that space, that is a national function of government. >> rose: meaning that the incumbent gains something because he is in a seat of power and, therefore, he is even responding to an emergency. >> that obama can go and staley stay in washington, d.c. and monitor the disaster, right, and the press corps will treat that a as being appropriate and presidential strategy where romney goes and has. >> rose: a fund raiser. >> a fund raise never ohio and say it is just a campaign rally, so maybe it reflects bias media coverage but it does put him in more of a corner. >> has there been and is it still a momentum for governor romney that came out of the first geability in denver? >> so .. we perceived, we don't perceive anymore momentum for romney, and let me define momentum, how we would think of it and that means are you still making gapes in the polls? and what we found a is that romney gained for a couple of weeks, after denver to make it a very close race, and then kind of got is you can, in fact, maybe there is a half a point -- rose: my impression there is
to receive 31.5 billion euros in new loans. the finance ministers urged government leaders to reach a consensus on labor reforms, too. the ministers will visit the issues when they meet again in two weeks. greek leaders seem to be taking that pressure seriously. they've submitted a revised draft budget to parliament outlining yet more austerity. they proposed reductions to spending of more than 9 billion euros. they intend to submit bills next week to cut pensions and the salaries of civil servants. >>> government leaders expect the europe economy will contract next year by 4.5%. they're urging their creditors to lease rescue loans as soon as possible. but many greeks are growing increasingly frustrated with the severely of the cuts. major unions announced a 48 hour general strike for next week. >>> while the eu pressures greece, its own spending poli policies are undefined in britain. members of prime minister's david cameron's own party backed an opposition amendment calling for a smaller eu budget. opposition lawmakers say increasing funding for the regional body is unacceptable.
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)